Landmark EU/Canada trade deal sets standard for UK

15-Feb-2017 @ 17:30

Emma McClarkin Emma McClarkin

David Campbell-Bannerman David Campbell-Bannerman

David Campbell-Bannerman David Campbell-Bannerman

Landmark EU/Canada trade deal sets standard for UK

The landmark EU-Canada trade deal approved today by the European Parliament sets a standard the UK can follow post-Brexit, believes Conservative Joint International Trade Spokesman Emma McClarkin MEP.

The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) is the most detailed ever signed between the EU and a developed nation and will be worth £1.3 billion a year to Britain alone.

Miss McClarkin said: "After seven long years the champions of free trade have battled through.

"This is a great deal in terms of reducing barriers, improving access to markets, delivering for jobs and growth and making it easier for small businesses to trade in the Canadian market.

"It is very much something that Britain will benefit from in the short term and we can look to it as setting a standard when it comes to negotiating our own deals.

"For a global UK this is the kind of deal we can look to replicate all over the world."

CETA was approved today by 408 votes to 254. Conservative Joint International Trade Spokesman David Campbell Bannerman, who helped guide the deal through Parliament as a shadow rapporteur for the European Conservatives and Reformists Group, said: "Once fully implemented CETA is expected to increase trade in goods and services between EU Member States and Canada by 23 per cent, worth £19 billion.

“This is the most modern trade deal ever and will give European companies access to Canadian procurement markets, something that Canada has never allowed before. In addition, it contains welcome new elements, such mutual recognition of professional qualifications for midwives, architects, lawyers, and doctors.

"It has however taken too long to get to this point - seven years. The EU must reflect on the time that it takes to get agreements negotiated if they are to be taken seriously in future with any major trading partners, and that includes with Britain."

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